Category Archives: Uncategorized

The process has begun to move the server

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As noted earlier, my hosting company 1and1.com is having major problems. As a result of their terrible customer service, lack of technical support and overall poor hosting performance this last week – I am moving the server to GoDaddy.com. It will hopefully be a seemless move for readers of my blog. I hope to have the new server up and running within the next day. The domain name will eventually be the same. If the URL above contains an IP address rather than geofoberhaus.com – you are viewing the blog from the new server but the domain name has not yet transferred.
I am sure that there may be some lost links for images, etc. upon the move. It has been very difficult to copy the existing content from the 1and1 server since it keeps going down.

Update on the hosting of this site

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After downtime of approximately 48 hours, my hosting company, www.1and1.com, may have finally resolved the problem. In the meantime, I have set-up an account with GoDaddy.com in case the issues return. Very frustrating experience with 1and1.com lately. If it wasn’t such a major task to move the site (especially the blog and its database) I would have already moved to GoDaddy.com. If 1and1.com gives me any more problems – once I return home for recovery from my surgery I will begin the task of seting up the new server and switching over. Don’t worry – it will still be www.geofoberhaus.com – just coming from a different server location. 1and1.com recently built a brand new state of the art server facility, but had some error giving them connectivity problems.

Camera & Cell Phone Batteries = Next DMCA Frontier?

First, they came for the after-market printer cartridges. Then they came for the garage door opener remotes. Now, they may come for the cell phone and camera batteries.

NEC announced yesterday that they are introducing “a new software for microcontrollers that detects counterfeit battery products in mobile phones and digital still camera batteries”:

“The growing number of worldwide incidences involving inferior counterfeit batteries is a considerable source of concern for manufacturers and customers alike. NEC Electronics’ authentication software offers a highly effective yet affordable solution to help detect such unauthorized products and prevent the damage caused by them.” said Kazuo Nakamura, General Manager, Device SI Division, NEC Electronics.

Preventing damage is one thing, but stiffling competition is another. Who’s to say that NEC won’t use this authentication as an excuse to sue “unauthorized” after-market competitors under the DMCA for making compatible replacement batteries? After all, in order to be compatible, wouldn’t these products would have to mimick the authentication codes of the original batteries? Such practices are exactly what got Static Control and Skylink sued in the printer cartridge and garage door cases mentioned above.

And the fun doesn’t stop there:

The software will be introduced in Japanese digital cameras by year’s end and is expected to be used in 50 million units by 2007. The software is ideal for use in mobile phones and batteries, but NEC Electronics is also considering extending this technology to “smart” keys, printers and ink cartridges, as well as bundling the technology into hardware options.

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, software-based authentication is the wave of the future. And now, with the DMCA, a near-monopoly! Future, here we come.

Update Engadget reports “Sony is planning to add something like this to their laptops, and that if the laptop detects a non-Sony battery it will simply refuse to work and prompt the user to insert an original one.”

[LawGeek]

Camera & Cell Phone Batteries = Next DMCA Frontier?

First, they came for the after-market printer cartridges. Then they came for the garage door opener remotes. Now, they may come for the cell phone and camera batteries.

NEC announced yesterday that they are introducing “a new software for microcontrollers that detects counterfeit battery products in mobile phones and digital still camera batteries”:

“The growing number of worldwide incidences involving inferior counterfeit batteries is a considerable source of concern for manufacturers and customers alike. NEC Electronics’ authentication software offers a highly effective yet affordable solution to help detect such unauthorized products and prevent the damage caused by them.” said Kazuo Nakamura, General Manager, Device SI Division, NEC Electronics.

Preventing damage is one thing, but stiffling competition is another. Who’s to say that NEC won’t use this authentication as an excuse to sue “unauthorized” after-market competitors under the DMCA for making compatible replacement batteries? After all, in order to be compatible, wouldn’t these products would have to mimick the authentication codes of the original batteries? Such practices are exactly what got Static Control and Skylink sued in the printer cartridge and garage door cases mentioned above.

And the fun doesn’t stop there:

The software will be introduced in Japanese digital cameras by year’s end and is expected to be used in 50 million units by 2007. The software is ideal for use in mobile phones and batteries, but NEC Electronics is also considering extending this technology to “smart” keys, printers and ink cartridges, as well as bundling the technology into hardware options.

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, software-based authentication is the wave of the future. And now, with the DMCA, a near-monopoly! Future, here we come.

Update Engadget reports “Sony is planning to add something like this to their laptops, and that if the laptop detects a non-Sony battery it will simply refuse to work and prompt the user to insert an original one.”

[LawGeek]